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HOW DOES GSOC SUPPORT THE TRANSMISSION OF ELECTRICITY?
GSOC works in partnership with Georgia Transmission in monitoring GTC’s thousands of miles of lines on the state’s Integrated Transmission System.
     For example, if GTC needs to isolate a portion of the line for maintenance work, the switching and scheduling is coordinated with GSOC. We also notify the affected EMCs of any planned maintenance work.
     GSOC helps restore electric service across the state during inclement and severe weather conditions. Lightning, icing and other weather-related elements can cause transmission lines to fail. We continuously monitor every delivery point to get a breaker, substation or transmission line back in service as quickly and as safely as possible.
 
HOW ELSE DO WE SERVE OUR MEMBER-OWNERS?
 
One important task we’re charged with is compiling the data that results in a customer’s monthly bill. Where do we get that data? 
     From revenue meters. These meters — more than 850 across the state — measure the electricity used by our member EMCs and send that information to the data recorders. That information then is used to generate an EMC’s monthly bill.
     But GSOC handles more than that in support of the EMCs and their scheduling agents — from hourly energy accounting and transmission services charges calculations, to post-operational reporting and data exchange with Georgia Power and Southern Company, to managing contracts and tariff administration.
 
    
The Integrated Transmission System
 
Started in 1975, participating utilities in the Integrated Transmission System jointly plan and operate the state’s electric transmission lines, which remain individually owned, built and maintained. Through agreements among Georgia Transmission, Georgia Power, Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia and Dalton Utilities, the ITS covers 17,500 miles of the state’s 18,500 miles of transmission lines.